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Road Tripping

Needless to say i was pretty down yesterday. It happens i guess, we tend to lose the ability to see the bigger picture of our lives. When we’re bogged down in day-to-day life, we don’t get the chance to step back and evaluate our problems properly. Sometimes depression causes us to have an outlook on life that involves a skewed view of the world.

Traveling allows us to see the bigger picture. It can help us put certain thoughts and beliefs in perspective and assess the way we think more candidly. When we take ourselves out of our usual environment, we are forced to literally see the world from different eyes. An accumulation of all the experiences we have while traveling can create a whole new thought process that can help. So I filled up the tank and hit the road. First Stop Huron Indiana.  Turns out Lawrence County has been awarded $230,000 for the clearance and demolition of the old Huron School building.The project's purpose is to alleviate ongoing safety concerns and return the eyesore to green space. Some of these old places i get why they would want to. For instance this one is full of Black mold and i guess a squatter lived here for some time filling the place up with excrement.  So unless you have a pretty good respirator stay away!! 

Huron High School was built in 1924 at a cost of $35,000. Additions were made over the years, but the structure was consumed by fire in 1959. It was rebuilt using insurance money and donations and utilized as a high school until 1963 when students were transported to Mitchell High School. It remained an elementary school for many years thereafter. A total of 504 pupils graduated from Huron High School.

Now it's just a crumbling shell of what it was. It is sad to lose old buildings like this but if it helps the "blight" so be it.

Next place i came to was Shoals Indiana, Home of the Famous "Jug Rock" well it's famous to locals, oh and a catfish festival.  

The overlooks here are a landscape photogs dream. 

Shoals Overlook is one of several natural formations in Martin County, Indiana. There are two “glacial boundaries” of major significance in Indiana geology. The outer boundary, which marks the southernmost advance of the older ice sheets and is commonly known as “the glacial boundary, transits an inverted U-shaped line across much of southern Indiana. This outer boundary was caused by the Illinoisan glaciation some 100,000+ years ago.


The Overlook was formed by forces that created the “outer boundary” and is the older of the two glacial activities. The newest glacial activity did not progress far enough south to fill in the ridges and valleys that are common to the southernmost Indiana counties.

Shoals is a cute quaint little place, pop somewhere around 800. Bo-Mac's Drive In is Awesome, and basically It's a seat for scenic drives. Seriously The overlooks are a photogs dream, and the place ( Martin Co) has such a rich history Because of its caves and cliffs, the region around and including Shoals was a popular hideout for bootleggers during the Prohibition. All kinds of stuff to explore and look at.

Which kinda leads to my next destination. Hindostan was the county’s first seat. With a big Emphasis on WAS. 

 A historic marker on County Road 550 stands one-half mile north of where the town was. There are a few surviving pioneer cemeteries nearby, a restored church, and holes left in a large flat rock along the river said to have been drilled to support the mills at Hindostan. No buildings survive. It’s as though Hindostan never existed.

A historic marker on County Road 550 stands one-half mile north of where the town was. There are a few surviving pioneer cemeteries nearby, a restored church, and holes left in a large flat rock along the river said to have been drilled to support the mills at Hindostan. No buildings survive. It’s as though Hindostan never existed.

The population in 1820 was about 1,200, making it one of the largest settlements in frontier Indiana. As a point of reference, the population of nearby Louisville, Kentucky, was then about 1,300.   An epidemic of yellow fever or cholera (perhaps a combination of both) broke out in Hindostan. Today, there are no signs of an existence of the town of Hindostan, except for the town cemeteries filled with the families lost to the Yellow Fever. In 1825

 

 

 

Thomas M. Clarke wrote, “In the fall [of 1820] there came a fever or pestilence that was more universal in its attacks and more virulent, when seated, than any scourge I ever knew, or, I think, ever occurred in Indiana.” Whole families died together and their houses were burned in their wake to prevent the spread of the “plague.” Many of the townspeople were buried in a mass grave, which may hold several hundred bodies. Its exact location is not known today, as the site was unmarked at the time.  Good times huh? By 1825, people had begun to leave Hindostan, and in 1828 the county seat was moved to Mt. Pleasant.  But, as for no one residing at Hindostan after 1828 as is popularly believed, history reveals that ferries ran all the way up in to the 1840s, and the famous mills were still in operation in 1855.  Domestic disputes were recorded in 1830, as were several assaults and batteries.  The depression of 1819-1820 resulted in people moving into Hindostan and buying property on “notes,” and never paying these notes back.  So many debts and lawsuits were accumulated by the citizens that eventually many fled the area.  Therefore, it seems that Hindostan lost most of its residents from moving rather than illness.
Either way who knows.

So by this time Storms were moving in and i decided to head home. Head clear and right as rain.

 

GrowingJeremy Fulk